History Preservation Newsletter
July 2017


“Riding it Forward”

Joe Ostaszewski, Biggest Loser Finalist and Florida State footballer bicycled 2,972 miles to take the 4-H Health Pledge; a big boost for 4-H members!


A History Mystery Solved

Faced with only a photo, a History Team member uncovered a 4-H Stock Show romance and more from the 1929 International Livestock Exposition. Do you have a “History Mystery” photo you can research?


J. C Penney was a long-time enthusiast of the 4-H Program. As early as 1929 he purchased the Grand Campion Steer, owned by a 4-H’er at the International Livestock Exposition in Chicago.


95 Years Ago . . .

4-H awarded the nation’s Healthiest Boy and Healthiest Girl. Though those awards are no longer given, the diet and lifestyle of former winners are definitely worth replicating.


65 Years Ago . . .

The US Postal Service issued a commemorative stamp to recognize the 50th anniversary of the beginning of 4-H. The collector’s item honors a significant milestone in 4-H History.


Letters to the Editor

A new feature. A 1957 IFYE Alumna shares the inspiration she received from Kathleen Flom, long-time 4-H international staff member. We’d also love to hear from you!


We hope you enjoy this issue.


 

Please help us preserve 4-H History . . .



History Preservation Newsletter
May-June 2017


400,000 Website Visits!

After 10 years of the 4-H History Team existence, and six years of counting website visitors, your 4-H History website has received over 400,000 visits worldwide. Thanks for your support.



4-H WWI Support

As patriotism swept the country, 4-H members joined the war effort enthusiastically. With slogans like “Back up the Cannon with the Canner,” the government promoted conservation and food preservation.



Camp Vail Trained Youth for War Effort

In 1917, the Theodore N. Vail School of Agriculture started training non-farm youth to meet the critical farm labor shortage due to the war. Camp Vail, later a part of the Eastern States Exposition, was seen as “a means to show the public the value of club work.”


National 4-H Camp, Hits a Milestone

Ninety years ago this month the first 4-H Members pitched their tents on the Washington Mall to learn, share and make their presence known in the Nation’s Capital.

Delegates and chaperones meet National 4-H Staff as they arrive at one of the early National camps in Washington DC.



“Son of a Southern Chef” wins TV Cook-off to Gift 4-H

Lazarus Lynch, a multimedia personality and chef beat out 15 other celebrity chefs to win a substantial financial gift for 4-H. The TV cooking show “Chopped” sponsored the competition. Google his name!


First Lady Lou Hoover Addressed 4-H

In a 1929 radio broadcast during National 4-H Camp on the DC Mall, Mrs. Hoover asked 4-H clubs to “be of service to their communities.” Continuing her interest in gender equality, Mrs. Hoover stressed that boys had an equal responsibility in homemaking.



We Ask Your Help – Again

You are the most important resource in preserving 4-H History and we rely on your kind assistance to help accomplish our goals. This time, we’re looking for a copy of the 1953 national 4-H poster; the original was painted by W. C. Griffith who painted 18 4-H posters and 16 national 4-H calendars.



 

Please help us preserve 4-H History . . .



Making History – 4-H Alumna Peggy Whitson

NASA astronaut Dr. Peggy Whitson embarked on her third mission to the International Space Station (ISS) in mid-November. Peggy grew up on a farm in Iowa, and was an active 4-H member. In a recent video produced by NASA and shown on PBS American Graduate Day, Peggy talked about the importance of 4-H in her life and today in the lives of millions of youth; see the interview at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NYWk9v0jKYc .

Peggy has made NASA and space history during her career:

  • With her third launch into space for the Expedition 50/51 ISS mission, Peggy
    • became the oldest woman in space. She celebrated her 57th birthday aboard the ISS.
    • became the first woman to command the ISS twice on April 9, 2017.
    • she seized the record for most spacewalks by a female in March of 2017
    • surpassed Jeff Williams’ record of 534 days, 2 hours and 48 minutes of cumulative time in space. When she returns to Earth, she’ll have spent more than 650 days in space
  • In her first mission, Expedition 5/6 in 2002, she was named NASA’s first Science Officer.
  • In her second mission in 2007-08, she became the first woman to command the ISS for Expedition 16.
  • After returning from Expedition 16, she became the first woman appointed as chief of the NASA Astronaut Office.
  • During her first two missions, Peggy performed six spacewalks, totaling 39 hours and 46 minutes.

While Peggy is in space, NASA and 4-H will release a series of learning activities about how NASA prepares crews to live together in space and how youth can develop these skills for their personal lives and future education and careers. The project will be announced in December 2016 and will become available online in monthly installments on the NASA and NIFA 4-H web sites during January – April 2017.



 

Please help us preserve 4-H History . . .



History Preservation Newsletter
April 2017

In 1969 National 4-H Week launched a year of Learning to Serve. Learning to Serve through 4-H is older than the pledge itself. This month our newsletter explores 4-H Service at several junctures in 4-H History. If you’re interested in seeing other vintage 4-H Posters you can view them at: https://www.nal.usda.gov/exhibits/speccoll/exhibits/show/poster-collections/elsie-carper-collection-on-ext



4-H Service in World War I

Members and Leaders joined the national movement to support of the war effort: raising and preserving food, recycling clothing, raising money for special support projects.


National 4-H Day of Service

April 2017 has been dedicated as a month to celebrate community service and service-learning throughout 4-H. The month of celebration will culminate with a National 4-H Day of Service on Saturday, April 29. 4-H’ers will undertake club, community and state service projects as part of the “True Leaders in Service” initiative in honor of National Volunteer Appreciation Month.




Contemporary 4-H History: A Health Summit

250 4-H’ers recently met at the to analyze data about the health of their communities. The 4-H Geospatial Leadership Team helped others access the data and interpret the findings, comparing the health of their communities with that of others in the state, and pinpointing gaps in health care.


“4-H History 101” Aims to Launch this Fall

A new online course is being developed by the 4-H History Preservation Leadership Team to help orient new staff about the philosophical base of 4-H. It includes a working definition of the public/private partnership which undergird the program at local, state and national levels. If you’d like to help write or serve as a reviewer, write to info@4-HHistoryPreservation.com


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How Old is the 4-H Flag?

We know the National 4-H Supply Service (4-H Mall) marketed 4-H flags in 1925, the year it started. Do you know of any 4-H flag older than that? Let us know.


4-H in Space: Then and Now

An Indiana 4-H’er designed a scientific experiment with chicken embryos to be carried into space on the 1986 Challenger mission, but it was lost in the explosion. Redesigned, “Chix in Space” went up in 1989 and was the forerunner of continuing worldwide embryonic research in space by NASA. And this week, 4-H alumna Peggy Whitson sets new records as commander of the current NASA mission.



Here on Earth, enjoy the spring-time and this issue!


 

Please help us preserve 4-H History . . .



News Article Index Now Available

A complete listing of all articles on the 4-H History Preservation News site is now available. To view the index, look for the ‘Article Index’ link at the top of the page. It is the fourth link to the right…

     History Home      News Home     Newsletter     Article Index     Calendar     RSS      

You may also view the index using this link: http://News.4-HHistoryPreservation.com/Article-Index/


 

Please help us preserve 4-H History . . .



History Preservation Newsletter
March 2017


4-H Alumna & NASA Astronaut Speaks to 4‑H’ers from Space

Peggy Whitson, Commander of NASA’s Expedition 50/51, a 4-H alumna, answered 4‑H’ers’ questions via down-link from the International Space Station (ISS) to Johnson Space Center in Texas. While on the ISS, she will surpass the current record of 534 days in space.


Tompkins County, NY, Starts a 4-H Memory Wall

As a way to promote awareness of 4-H history, Tompkins County mobilized the theme “4‑H Memories Last a Lifetime” by collecting memorabilia (1932-2015) for a Memory Wall at the 4-H Fair. Members, leaders and parents contributed items and county staff cleaned out old files to populate the exhibit.


 

These are examples of National 4-H Charters that were cherished by many 4-H members and families for the things that were learned and projects completed by countless youth through loving guidance of dedicated adult volunteer leaders. Both charters were signed by the then-current Secretary of Agriculture and represent charters issued by USDA to clubs across the country at that time.

The Mavis 4-H Club (left) of Pennington County, Minnesota, received their charter in what appears to be 1944 and met charter requirements through 1978 (34 years), while the Ellis Hollow Homemakers (right) of Tompkins County, New York, received their charter in 1958 and continued to complete the year’s work through 1981 (23 years).

 


Who was Jessie Fields Shambaugh?

A film by an Iowa 4-H’er entered in the 2016 “FilmFest 4‑H” answers that question for you. Adam Clayton’s film took second place in the “Voices of 4‑H” category. This year’s “FilmFest 4-H” is July 23-27 in Kansas City.


Horse Racing’s Youngest Jockey Won the Triple Crown in 1978

Steve Cauthen, a 4-H’er from Kentucky, started racing in 1976; in this first race, he came in last; in his second race he came in first. In 1977 he led the nation in horserace wins with 487. The Triple Crown was not won again until 2015.



Tell us the Year this 4-H Calendar was Printed

In the 10 years the 4-H History Preservation Team has been working, we’ve collected 88 different 4-H calendars, printed calendar images and pieces of original artwork. Here’s one recently uncovered on which we have no information; we’re hoping your vivid 4-H memories can help us date it.


4-H History Preservation Team Celebrates 10th Anniversary!

The National 4-H History Preservation Program started in 2007 with a group of seven volunteers, mostly retired national level 4-H staff; we now number 12, including some current staff and some retired state staff, all still volunteers. The number of visitors to our website is rapidly nearing 200,000 globally and our Newsletter reaches some 5,900. We’re grateful for that generous response. We rely on your continued support; please email us.



Enjoy this Issue!

4-H and Radio: Early Days Growing Together

The following story is from the February 2014 issue of the 4-H History Preservation Newsletter

From National 4-H News, November, 1937, Page 20

When the National Committee on Boys’ and Girls’ Club Work (now National 4-H Council) was started in late 1921, it basically consisted of a staff of one person – Guy Noble – working at a “desk on loan” in the Chicago headquarters offices of the American Farm Bureau, with the assistance of a part-time secretary (also on loan). In addition to the overwhelming burden of raising funds in unchartered waters and, planning and managing the major national 4-H event, National 4-H Congress, Guy Noble also knew that it was critical to promote the concept of 4-H to broader audiences if it was to grow.

As early as 1922, before it was even a year old, the National Committee on Boys’ and Girls’ Club Work became a radio pioneer. Arrangements were made that year with the Westinghouse Radio Service of Chicago for news of Boys’ and Girls’ Club Work to be presented each Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 6 PM. In 1922 there were only 30 radio stations in the country and a quarter million receiver sets scattered across the nation.

The decades of the 1920s and 1930s became a growth period for both radio and for 4-H together. At one point all the major radio networks were carrying 4-H radio programs. And, there was the National 4-H Music Hour on NBC which featured the United States Marine Corps Band and highlighted music appreciation for young people. The National 4-H News magazine carried a regular column of upcoming radio programs in their monthly publication.

David Sarnoff, president of the Radio Corporation of America (RCA), and one of the corporate giants in the communications industry, partnered with 4-H. He became a board member of the National Committee on Boys’ and Girls’ Club Work and RCA would become a national sponsor, funding a new activity for 4-H Club leaders and members. It was the National Program on Social Progress which helped to train and encourage 4-H members and adults in their communities to make the community more pleasant and improve the quality of living. This included: being more “neighborly,” and more resourceful, as well as stressing more education and creative community social activities. The program placed heavy emphasis on using the radio for communications.
By the 1930s, many rural stations were hiring farm broadcasters; first to announce the grain and livestock markets each day, but then to support rural community activities and events. Four-H fit nicely into this pattern as well; with farm broadcasters becoming strong friends of 4-H. At the same time Extension at every level – federal, state and county – were embracing the use of radio. A decade later, by the end of the 40s, over half of the radio stations in the country were regularly carrying Extension programs, including much coverage of 4-H. The radio was playing in the house, the barn, the car; no longer a novelty, it was a part of our everyday lives.

A new segment on  4-H and Radio is on the National 4-H History section of the 4-H History Preservation website. We hope you enjoy it. Take a look at it at: http://4-Hhistorypreservation.com/history/Radio/. If you have comments about 4-H and radio please contact: Info@4-HHistoryPreservation.com.


 

Please help us preserve 4-H History . . .



Folks who Helped Make 4-H Great
Thomas E. Wilson

The following story is from the May-June issue of the 4-H History Preservation Newsletter


This is the tenth and final article in the series, reprinted from 1962 National 4-H News, which featured people identified by Extension Service professional staff members as “folks who helped make 4-H great.”

http://4-hhistorypreservation.com/History/Service_Committee/Img/Pres_Thomas_E_Wilson.jpg

Thomas E. Wilson
July 22, 1868 – August 4, 1958

It is entirely fitting that this alphabetical series of ten articles should close with a review of Thomas E. Wilson’s influence on today’s 4-H program. For 4-H is made great by two widespread circles of cooperation. One is the teamwork of federal, state and county governments providing public financial support for 4-H. This is the source of the title “Cooperative Extension Service,” parent agency to 4-H.

In the creation of the other important cooperative alliance in 4-H – that between business and government – this giant of the meat-packing industry, Wilson, played one of the leading roles.

Congress created the Cooperative Extension Service in 1914, thus establishing boys’ and girls’ club work officially. Just four years after this starting date – in 1918 – Wilson made his entry into this field by playing meal host to a group of Iowa rural youths during the International Livestock Show in Chicago. This was one of the forerunners of today’s national awards programs and the generous hospitality offered Club Congress delegates each fall by the large corporations of America.

Wilson also held a key spot in the creation of the National Committee on Boys and Girls Club Work, now called the National 4-H Service Committee. This group has been a meeting point between business and government since 1921. That was the year in which Wilson and a handful of other early friends of club work helped Guy Noble establish the National Committee as a service agency to 4-H.

Having taken over a nearly-ruined meat-packing business in 1916 to create Wilson & Co., this pioneer in 4-H support was under great pressure both financially and for his time and energy. Yet, Guy Noble has recounted, Wilson was always willing to give time and effort to club work whether to discuss organizational problems or to open doors for Noble with important businessmen who might support 4-H.

As the second chairman of the National Committee, Wilson gave some 37 years of conscientious service to 4-H club work. He succeeded E. T. Meredith in this position in 1924 and held it until 1958, shortly before his death.

Some of the specific benefits which Wilson brought to 4-H Club work besides the ones already mentioned could easily be overlooked, because their influence on the program has been subtle. They were important just the same.

For instance, his insistence on getting the finest of speakers and entertainment at the Wilson-sponsored Club Congress banquet set a standard of quality for all future sponsors. His bringing to 4-H support the cream of the business world established an unimpeached relationship that still exists. His support of 4-H in its early days lent much-needed support at a crucial time. His high personal standards set a lifetime goal for the 4-H members he so much enjoyed meeting.

Wilson’s respect for the importance of young people led him to work with many youth agencies. Speaking of 4-H, he set forth the goal of all leaders in club work today: “We all want to aid boys and girls to achieve, to learn and to become self-reliant citizens.” This 4-H pioneer certainly earned the title accorded him by his associates, “The business god-father of 4-H Club work.”

This is the last in a series of articles describing the influence on today’s 4-H program of ten outstanding pioneers in 4-H. these articles have included the following people: E. W. Aiton, O. H. Benson, T. A. Erickson, A. B. Graham, A. G. Kettunen, Guy L. Noble, C. B. Smith, R. A. Turner, Miss Gertrude Warren, and Thomas E. Wilson. Individual articles from the series are available on the 4-H History Website http://4-HistoryPreservation.com


 

Please help us preserve 4-H History . . .



4-H Novels Have a Popular History


The following story is from the National Compendium of 4-H Promotion and Visibility on the National 4-H History website at

http://4-HHistoryPreservation.com/History/4-H_Promotion/



4-H novels and children’s books may not be well known in today’s 4-H; however, starting in the 1920s and in every decade since then, new ones have appeared. Several dozen titles are documented and, at one time, Miss Gertrude Warren from the 4-H USDA office issued a listing of “approved” 4-H juvenile literature. While current research has not uncovered this listing, many of the titles are included in the “4-H Novels” segment of the “4-H books and printed archives” section of the National 4-H History Preservation website.







 

Please help us preserve 4-H History . . .



Universal Pictures Distributes 4-H Film, Tom Boy and the Champ


The following story is from the National Compendium of 4-H Promotion and Visibility on the National 4-H History website at

http://4-HHistoryPreservation.com/History/4-H_Promotion/


“Tom Boy and the Champ,” a 1961 Signal Pictures’ production and released by Universal International-Films, starred Candy Moore, Ben Johnson, Jesse White and Rex Allen.

Tommy Jo, a 13-year-old Texas ranch girl, wins a calf at the county fair and names him “Champy.” While training the animal, Tommy Jo gets caught in a storm and develops polio. With the help of her aunt and uncle and her parson, Tommy Jo learns to walk again and discovers that the secret of training Champy is to soothe him with music. She enters her pet – now grown – in the Houston Fat Stock Show, but loses when her radio breaks down and no music is available. The parson encourages her to persevere, and with the help of the local 4-H Club, Tommy Jo is able to enter Champy in the International Live Stock Exposition in Chicago. They win the grand championship when the parson sings a song to Champy. Tommy Jo’s happiness is short-lived, however, as she learns that all champions are auctioned off for beef. Unable to raise the $30,000 auction price, Tommy Jo has a relapse and is rushed to the hospital with pneumonia. Fred Anderson, a kindly meatpacker, saves Champy from the slaughterhouse and reunites him with Tommy Jo at the hospital. During the International Exposition segment, the film shows the National 4-H Congress parade in the Arena.

Advertised through National 4-H News, “the intriguing ‘feel good’ entertainment was produced in honor of 4-H Clubs across the country.”

Music from the film includes:

  • Get Ready with the Ribbon, Judge Written by Tommy Reynolds and William Lightfoot
  • Who Says Animals Don’t Cry Written by Tommy Reynolds and William Lightfoot
  • Barbecue Rock Written by Elsie Pierce Wilkes

The film is available in DVD format.




 

Please help us preserve 4-H History . . .