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History Preservation Newsletter
March 2017


4-H Alumna & NASA Astronaut Speaks to 4‑H’ers from Space

Peggy Whitson, Commander of NASA’s Expedition 50/51, a 4-H alumna, answered 4‑H’ers’ questions via down-link from the International Space Station (ISS) to Johnson Space Center in Texas. While on the ISS, she will surpass the current record of 534 days in space.


Tompkins County, NY, Starts a 4-H Memory Wall

As a way to promote awareness of 4-H history, Tompkins County mobilized the theme “4‑H Memories Last a Lifetime” by collecting memorabilia (1932-2015) for a Memory Wall at the 4-H Fair. Members, leaders and parents contributed items and county staff cleaned out old files to populate the exhibit.


 

These are examples of National 4-H Charters that were cherished by many 4-H members and families for the things that were learned and projects completed by countless youth through loving guidance of dedicated adult volunteer leaders. Both charters were signed by the then-current Secretary of Agriculture and represent charters issued by USDA to clubs across the country at that time.

The Mavis 4-H Club (left) of Pennington County, Minnesota, received their charter in what appears to be 1944 and met charter requirements through 1978 (34 years), while the Ellis Hollow Homemakers (right) of Tompkins County, New York, received their charter in 1958 and continued to complete the year’s work through 1981 (23 years).

 


Who was Jessie Fields Shambaugh?

A film by an Iowa 4-H’er entered in the 2016 “FilmFest 4‑H” answers that question for you. Adam Clayton’s film took second place in the “Voices of 4‑H” category. This year’s “FilmFest 4-H” is July 23-27 in Kansas City.


Horse Racing’s Youngest Jockey Won the Triple Crown in 1978

Steve Cauthen, a 4-H’er from Kentucky, started racing in 1976; in this first race, he came in last; in his second race he came in first. In 1977 he led the nation in horserace wins with 487. The Triple Crown was not won again until 2015.



Tell us the Year this 4-H Calendar was Printed

In the 10 years the 4-H History Preservation Team has been working, we’ve collected 88 different 4-H calendars, printed calendar images and pieces of original artwork. Here’s one recently uncovered on which we have no information; we’re hoping your vivid 4-H memories can help us date it.


4-H History Preservation Team Celebrates 10th Anniversary!

The National 4-H History Preservation Program started in 2007 with a group of seven volunteers, mostly retired national level 4-H staff; we now number 12, including some current staff and some retired state staff, all still volunteers. The number of visitors to our website is rapidly nearing 200,000 globally and our Newsletter reaches some 5,900. We’re grateful for that generous response. We rely on your continued support; please email us.



Enjoy this Issue!

4-H and Radio: Early Days Growing Together

The following story is from the February 2014 issue of the 4-H History Preservation Newsletter

From National 4-H News, November, 1937, Page 20

When the National Committee on Boys’ and Girls’ Club Work (now National 4-H Council) was started in late 1921, it basically consisted of a staff of one person – Guy Noble – working at a “desk on loan” in the Chicago headquarters offices of the American Farm Bureau, with the assistance of a part-time secretary (also on loan). In addition to the overwhelming burden of raising funds in unchartered waters and, planning and managing the major national 4-H event, National 4-H Congress, Guy Noble also knew that it was critical to promote the concept of 4-H to broader audiences if it was to grow.

As early as 1922, before it was even a year old, the National Committee on Boys’ and Girls’ Club Work became a radio pioneer. Arrangements were made that year with the Westinghouse Radio Service of Chicago for news of Boys’ and Girls’ Club Work to be presented each Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 6 PM. In 1922 there were only 30 radio stations in the country and a quarter million receiver sets scattered across the nation.

The decades of the 1920s and 1930s became a growth period for both radio and for 4-H together. At one point all the major radio networks were carrying 4-H radio programs. And, there was the National 4-H Music Hour on NBC which featured the United States Marine Corps Band and highlighted music appreciation for young people. The National 4-H News magazine carried a regular column of upcoming radio programs in their monthly publication.

David Sarnoff, president of the Radio Corporation of America (RCA), and one of the corporate giants in the communications industry, partnered with 4-H. He became a board member of the National Committee on Boys’ and Girls’ Club Work and RCA would become a national sponsor, funding a new activity for 4-H Club leaders and members. It was the National Program on Social Progress which helped to train and encourage 4-H members and adults in their communities to make the community more pleasant and improve the quality of living. This included: being more “neighborly,” and more resourceful, as well as stressing more education and creative community social activities. The program placed heavy emphasis on using the radio for communications.
By the 1930s, many rural stations were hiring farm broadcasters; first to announce the grain and livestock markets each day, but then to support rural community activities and events. Four-H fit nicely into this pattern as well; with farm broadcasters becoming strong friends of 4-H. At the same time Extension at every level – federal, state and county – were embracing the use of radio. A decade later, by the end of the 40s, over half of the radio stations in the country were regularly carrying Extension programs, including much coverage of 4-H. The radio was playing in the house, the barn, the car; no longer a novelty, it was a part of our everyday lives.

A new segment on  4-H and Radio is on the National 4-H History section of the 4-H History Preservation website. We hope you enjoy it. Take a look at it at: http://4-Hhistorypreservation.com/history/Radio/. If you have comments about 4-H and radio please contact: Info@4-HHistoryPreservation.com.


 

 

Folks who Helped Make 4-H Great
Thomas E. Wilson

The following story is from the May-June issue of the 4-H History Preservation Newsletter


This is the tenth and final article in the series, reprinted from 1962 National 4-H News, which featured people identified by Extension Service professional staff members as “folks who helped make 4-H great.”

http://4-hhistorypreservation.com/History/Service_Committee/Img/Pres_Thomas_E_Wilson.jpg

Thomas E. Wilson
July 22, 1868 – August 4, 1958

It is entirely fitting that this alphabetical series of ten articles should close with a review of Thomas E. Wilson’s influence on today’s 4-H program. For 4-H is made great by two widespread circles of cooperation. One is the teamwork of federal, state and county governments providing public financial support for 4-H. This is the source of the title “Cooperative Extension Service,” parent agency to 4-H.

In the creation of the other important cooperative alliance in 4-H – that between business and government – this giant of the meat-packing industry, Wilson, played one of the leading roles.

Congress created the Cooperative Extension Service in 1914, thus establishing boys’ and girls’ club work officially. Just four years after this starting date – in 1918 – Wilson made his entry into this field by playing meal host to a group of Iowa rural youths during the International Livestock Show in Chicago. This was one of the forerunners of today’s national awards programs and the generous hospitality offered Club Congress delegates each fall by the large corporations of America.

Wilson also held a key spot in the creation of the National Committee on Boys and Girls Club Work, now called the National 4-H Service Committee. This group has been a meeting point between business and government since 1921. That was the year in which Wilson and a handful of other early friends of club work helped Guy Noble establish the National Committee as a service agency to 4-H.

Having taken over a nearly-ruined meat-packing business in 1916 to create Wilson & Co., this pioneer in 4-H support was under great pressure both financially and for his time and energy. Yet, Guy Noble has recounted, Wilson was always willing to give time and effort to club work whether to discuss organizational problems or to open doors for Noble with important businessmen who might support 4-H.

As the second chairman of the National Committee, Wilson gave some 37 years of conscientious service to 4-H club work. He succeeded E. T. Meredith in this position in 1924 and held it until 1958, shortly before his death.

Some of the specific benefits which Wilson brought to 4-H Club work besides the ones already mentioned could easily be overlooked, because their influence on the program has been subtle. They were important just the same.

For instance, his insistence on getting the finest of speakers and entertainment at the Wilson-sponsored Club Congress banquet set a standard of quality for all future sponsors. His bringing to 4-H support the cream of the business world established an unimpeached relationship that still exists. His support of 4-H in its early days lent much-needed support at a crucial time. His high personal standards set a lifetime goal for the 4-H members he so much enjoyed meeting.

Wilson’s respect for the importance of young people led him to work with many youth agencies. Speaking of 4-H, he set forth the goal of all leaders in club work today: “We all want to aid boys and girls to achieve, to learn and to become self-reliant citizens.” This 4-H pioneer certainly earned the title accorded him by his associates, “The business god-father of 4-H Club work.”

This is the last in a series of articles describing the influence on today’s 4-H program of ten outstanding pioneers in 4-H. these articles have included the following people: E. W. Aiton, O. H. Benson, T. A. Erickson, A. B. Graham, A. G. Kettunen, Guy L. Noble, C. B. Smith, R. A. Turner, Miss Gertrude Warren, and Thomas E. Wilson. Individual articles from the series are available on the 4-H History Website http://4-HistoryPreservation.com


 



 

4-H Novels Have a Popular History


The following story is from the National Compendium of 4-H Promotion and Visibility on the National 4-H History website at

http://4-HHistoryPreservation.com/History/4-H_Promotion/



4-H novels and children’s books may not be well known in today’s 4-H; however, starting in the 1920s and in every decade since then, new ones have appeared. Several dozen titles are documented and, at one time, Miss Gertrude Warren from the 4-H USDA office issued a listing of “approved” 4-H juvenile literature. While current research has not uncovered this listing, many of the titles are included in the “4-H Novels” segment of the “4-H books and printed archives” section of the National 4-H History Preservation website.







 

 

Universal Pictures Distributes 4-H Film, Tom Boy and the Champ


The following story is from the National Compendium of 4-H Promotion and Visibility on the National 4-H History website at

http://4-HHistoryPreservation.com/History/4-H_Promotion/


“Tom Boy and the Champ,” a 1961 Signal Pictures’ production and released by Universal International-Films, starred Candy Moore, Ben Johnson, Jesse White and Rex Allen.

Tommy Jo, a 13-year-old Texas ranch girl, wins a calf at the county fair and names him “Champy.” While training the animal, Tommy Jo gets caught in a storm and develops polio. With the help of her aunt and uncle and her parson, Tommy Jo learns to walk again and discovers that the secret of training Champy is to soothe him with music. She enters her pet – now grown – in the Houston Fat Stock Show, but loses when her radio breaks down and no music is available. The parson encourages her to persevere, and with the help of the local 4-H Club, Tommy Jo is able to enter Champy in the International Live Stock Exposition in Chicago. They win the grand championship when the parson sings a song to Champy. Tommy Jo’s happiness is short-lived, however, as she learns that all champions are auctioned off for beef. Unable to raise the $30,000 auction price, Tommy Jo has a relapse and is rushed to the hospital with pneumonia. Fred Anderson, a kindly meatpacker, saves Champy from the slaughterhouse and reunites him with Tommy Jo at the hospital. During the International Exposition segment, the film shows the National 4-H Congress parade in the Arena.

Advertised through National 4-H News, “the intriguing ‘feel good’ entertainment was produced in honor of 4-H Clubs across the country.”

Music from the film includes:

  • Get Ready with the Ribbon, Judge Written by Tommy Reynolds and William Lightfoot
  • Who Says Animals Don’t Cry Written by Tommy Reynolds and William Lightfoot
  • Barbecue Rock Written by Elsie Pierce Wilkes

The film is available in DVD format.




 



 

History Preservation Newsletter
November/December 2016


4-H Alum in NASA Launch

In her third mission to the International Space Station she will surpass the current record of 534 days in space.


1924 4-H Congress Starts New Tradition>

Can you guess what it was? Did you know that National 4-H Congress was held in Chicago for more than 50 years?



Montana 4-H’er assists official lighting of US Capitol Christmas Tree in 2008




Each year, hundreds of students from the Capitol Christmas Tree’s home state enter the Capitol Christmas Tree drawing to receive a free trip to Washington, D.C. and help the Speaker of the House in lighting the tree. Chris Gabrielson from Havre, MT, was the lucky winner of the 2008 drawing.
(from the December, 2013 National 4-H History Newsletter)



4-H Enrollment Tops One Million in 1931

It’s now around seven million with a 2025 goal of ten million members.


National 4-H Council Predecessor Born in 1921

Created as the National Committee for Boys’ and Girls’ Club Work, the private sector body began decades of 4-H program support.



How Are States Using 4-H History?

A new column starting this month will share ideas from clubs, counties and states on how staff incorporates 4-H history in daily work.


Enjoy the Holidays and this Issue!


 

 

History Preservation Newsletter
September/October 2016



4-H History Map Grows

At NAEA4-HA in New Orleans earlier this month, 4-H educators from 30 states explored “points of interest” (POIs) flagged on the National 4-H History Map.


Your Hall of Fame Laureates Were in the National 4-H News

Earlier this month during National 4-H Week, 16 new Laureates were inducted into the National 4-H Hall of Fame. Several fall issues of National 4-H News contain stories about future Laureates and their contributions to 4-H.



Harlan Sanders


What Led to 4-H Congress?

A 1919 tour of Armour Meat Packing Company is considered the spark that led to creation of National 4-H Congress, held annually in Chicago for over seven decades. Whose idea was it?



A Missing 4-H Calendar?

You may have the answer to identity of an undocumented piece of art at the National 4-H Center.


4-H is not new to Space

This year’s National 4-H Science Day picks up a favorite theme of 4-H: space and flight. The thematic partnership goes way back.


And then there’s NAE4-HA

If you missed our booth in New Orleans, we still want to hear from you about 4-H History activities in your area.


Enjoy the beautiful fall and this issue!

History Preservation Newsletter
August 2016


Centenarian 4-H Alumna Honored

National 4-H Council is highlighting 4-H alumni and sharing the impact 4-H has had on their lives; this month, they spotlight a very special 4-H alumna, Martha Ann Miller, who celebrated her 105th birthday on August 6.

Read More …


4-H’ers Praised in 1945 World Wide Broadcast

On August 30, 1945, 4-H Club work got the spotlight during the broadcast of the college All-Stars vs. Green Bay Packers’ annual football classic known as the College All-Star game.

Read More …



Labor Day Floats?

It seems that 4-H is always up for a parade. With Labor Day coming, how many 4-H History floats will we see in the country’s community parades?
Read More …

This 1968 National 4-H Calendar produced by Shaw Barton Calendar Company is an example of a 4-H float of yesteryear. What will we see on a 2016 4-H float?

This 1968 National 4-H Calendar produced by Shaw Barton Calendar Company is an example of a 4-H float of yesteryear. What will we see on a 2016 4-H float?




4-H History Map

How did Drum’s Valley Pennsylvania, which documented its 4-H club history in 1959, get on the National 4-H History Map? Has your club, county or state nominated historical sites?

Read More …


FilmFest 4-H’ers Learn and Earn

4-H’ers got state-of-the-art coaching as well as the chance to compete for awards in five categories. With the 2016 film festival over, it’s not too early to plan entries for July 2017.

Read More …



It’s Fair Season!

Let us know about the 4-H History exhibits you are presenting at County and State Fairs at info@4-HHistoryPreservation.com and send pictures.

Read More …


History Preservation Newsletter
May/June 2016

Summer is officially here and 4-H history is being made every day.

This is the season traditionally ultra-busy for 4-H’ers, and so it has been whether members were from 1916 or 2016. Your 4-H History Preservation Program is here to share some of the experiences of those 1916 (and earlier or later) 4-H’ers.



Another of the “Greats”

Thomas E. Wilson started promoting 4-H in 1918, used the International Livestock Show to reward young 4-H members, and basically started National 4-H Congress. His 1962 profile is here.


4-H Academy Awards

A two-time Academy Award winning star has been a big fan of 4-H for years. First, guess the actor, then guess the 4-H content area that drew his attention.


4-H History Map

It just keeps growing and growing with your continued local 4-H input! Hopefully, your local sites are already on there. But can you pass the 4-H History Map Quiz?

Tree_Plantings


The 4-H – Peace Corps Link

Lots of folks say 4-H started Peace Corps, but that is probably still an open question. Can you identify the countries in South America where 4-H Peace Corps began?


Girls’ 4-H Uniforms = Pants?

It started the same year that the 4-H pledge and the 4-H motto were officially authorized. Do you know where? And when?


Please enjoy our summer issue.