HTTPS Comes to the 4-HHistoryPreservation Web Site

The 4-H History Preservation site at 4-HHistoryPreservation.com was switched over to use the HTTPS protocol effective April 12, 2018.

What does this mean? There are two primary ways to view information on a web site: HTTP and HTTPS. HTTP transfers information between your computer and the web host using clear text. By contrast, using HTTPS encrypts all communications. (The S in HTTPS stands for ‘Secure’.)

Oversimplified, using HTTP is like sitting at a table in a diner where you can hear the conversations of everyone around you… and they may well hear yours. In the online world, this means that someone, usually the bad guys, is able to listen in on your conversation and possibly hack in to it to steal information such as passwords and credit card information, track your movements on-line, etc.

With HTTPS, all communication between you and the web server are encrypted. If someone tries to listen in, all they see is garbage. This includes your service provider.

Aside from the above, some of the reasons for using HTTPS are:

Search engine rankings improve with HTTPS.
Google and other search engines are giving a higher rank to sites that use HTTPS.

Enhanced privacy.
When a web site uses HTTPS, no one, including your service provider, can see URLs and content in an unencrypted form. All they will see is garbage. Keep in mind, however, that the actual domain name is always transmitted in clear text. While this allows someone to see what sites you are visiting, they are unable to see any content.

Public trust is increased.
Using HTTPS shows that the site owner cares about you, your privacy and your information. Modern browsers are starting to highlight secure web sites in the address bar. For example, the Google Chrome browser places ‘Secure’ in green at the front of the site in the address bar.

Other sites within the 4-H History Preservation Program will be transitioned to HTTPS in the coming months. The only thing that you should notice as sites transition is possibly the manner in which your browser shows the site address.


 

Please help us preserve 4-H History . . .



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